8 Input Devices for Computers

1.Keyboard In computing, a keyboard is an input device, partially modeled after the typewriter keyboard, which uses an arrangement of buttons or keys, to act as mechanical levers or electronic switches. A keyboard typically has characters engraved or printed on the keys and each press of a key typically corresponds to a single written symbol. However, to produce some symbols requires pressing and holding several keys simultaneously or in sequence.

2. Mouse In computing, a mouse (plural mice, mouses, or mouse devices.) is a pointing device that functions by detecting two-dimensional motion relative to its supporting surface. Physically, a mouse consists of an object held under one of the user’s hands, with one or more buttons. It sometimes features other elements, such as “wheels”, which allow the user to perform various system-dependent operations, or extra buttons or features can add more control or dimensional input

3. Touchpad A touchpad (also trackpad) is a pointing device consisting of specialized surface that can translate the motion and position of a user’s fingers to a relative position on screen. They are a common feature of laptop computers and also used as a substitute for a computer mouse where desk space is scarce. They can also be found on personal digital assistants (PDAs) and some portable media players, such as the iPod using the click wheel. Also, it is a new type of Hanvon multitouch device.A touchpad is perhaps the most common kind of tactile sensor.

4. Joystick A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling. Joysticks are often used to control video games, and usually have one or more push-buttons whose state can also be read by the computer. A popular variation of the joystick used on modern video game consoles is the analog stick. The joystick has been the principal flight control in the cockpit of many aircraft, particularly military fast jets, where center stick or side-stick location may be employed.

5. Microphone A microphone (colloquially called a mic or mike (both pronounced /?ma?k/)) is an acoustic-to-electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. In 1876, Emile Berliner invented the first microphone used as a telephone voice transmitter. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, tape recorders, karaoke systems, hearing aids, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, FRS radios, megaphones, in radio and television broadcasting and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic checking or knock sensors.

6. Concept Keyboard An overlay keyboard is a specialized keyboard with no pre-set keys. Each key can be programmed with a wide range of different functions. Overlay keyboards are often used as a quick and easy way to input items with just two buttons. Overlay keyboards generally consist of a flat grid of unmarked buttons. After the keyboard is programmed, a sheet, called an overlay, is placed overtop to identify each key. The overlay can consist of any combination of words, symbols, or even pictures

7. Scanner In computing, a scanner is a device that optically scans images, printed text, handwriting, or an object, and converts it to a digital image. Common examples found in offices are variations of the desktop (or flatbed) scanner where the document is placed on a glass window for scanning. Hand-held scanners, where the device is moved by hand, have evolved from text scanning “wands” to 3D scanners used for industrial design, reverse engineering, test and measurement, orthotics, gaming and other applications. Mechanically driven scanners that move the document are typically used for large-format documents, where a flatbed design would be impractical.

8. Touch screen A touch screen is an electronic visual output that can detect the presence and location of a touch within the display area. The term generally refers to touch or contact to the display of the device by a finger or hand. Touch screens can also sense other passive objects, such as a pen. However, if the object sensed is active, as with a light pen, the term touch screen is generally not applicable. The ability to interact physically with what is shown on a display (a form of “direct manipulation”) typically indicates the presence of a touch screen